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of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
is the day i break my diet. oh, this job. how do i work with these conditions? hello, america. i have decided, because i saw the president's town hall meeting -- oh, it was rivetting. i think i have to change my thinking around this healthcare bill, because now, all of a sudden, reputable doctors are showing up to town halls, like totally reputable doctors, like totally showing their support for obama-care. >> your name? >> we're position is that we are like so for treating preventable conditions. how will it help me as a p.d.p.? >> first of all, give her a hand, because she is a primary care physician. [applause] how long have you been practicing? >> four years. >> give her another hand! glenn: i got to tell you, that was like so awesome, she was just like, there, i mean, she was like, i'm a doctor and i have doctor-like questions. that was great, and then, finally, a town haller, without that pesky cell phone interrupting sheila. it was great. i loved how sheila was spontaneous, you know, give sheila a little loving. it was great. it was unscripted. it was almost a pure moment. sheila jacks
on board, because america's doctors and nurses know how badly we need reform. [applause] we have broad agreement in congress on about 80% of what we are trying to achieve. we have agreement from drug companies to make prescription drugs more affordable for seniors. $80 billion that can cut the doughnut hole that seniors have to deal with on prescription drug plans in half. [applause] the aarp supports this policy and agrees with us that reform must happen this year. because we are getting close, the fight is getting fierce. history is clear. every time wherein side of reform, special interest are fighting back with everything they have got -- every time we are in sight of reform. let's face it, they get people scared, and understandably. i understand why people are nervous. health care is a big deal. in fact, whenever america has set about solving our toughest problems, there have always been those who sought to preserve the status quo by scaring the american people. that is what happened when fdr tried to pass social security. they said that was socialism. verbatim, that is what they
that should horrify america and the connection to statements that other people and white house and what it new orleans your health care in the future particularly if you are elderly, handicapped or have very young child. if you believe this country is great the government health care is taking us in a direction we promised ourselves we never go down again. stand up, come, follow me. >> glenn: hello, america. tonight i ask you to stay with the program. this is not a sound by the program but it will taken out of context and it will be used fearmongering. what i call this is question with boldness. questions that need answers. we must have answers. i am only following the directions of the president of the united states. he told us how to find out what he really believes in. that is exactly what we're going to do in in a couple of minutes we'll talk about the views of obama's soldiers and why it's important to look -- obama's czars but first i wanted to start some places and show you the beginning of and the history of eugenics which means basically creating a master race by discouraging reproduc
and america wife. then he put the cat in a bag filled with rocks and threw it in lynch point. some say the punishment just isn't enough. >> i think there needs to be a bigger lesson here. there definitely needs to be counselling on top of more jail time. people need to know this is unacceptable. a lot of people say it is just a cat or an animal, but it is a living being. >> abel and mcdowell were released on their own recoming distance. >> and a cat cruelty case in howard county has ended with a 74-day jail sentence. that is how long he will spend behind bars after police found 74 dead cats in her columbia home in 2006. official responded to the home after neighbors complained about an odd other. four people are covering after an accident involving an ambulance in southwest baltimore. city medical number 12 collided with a small s.u.v. at the intersection of edmonton avenue and dennniso street. the two people in the s.u.v. were treated at the university of maryland medical center. >> exactly how this descend occurred has not yet been determined. we have our investigators on location to
. this is a great book, singing in a strange land, the black church and the transformation of america. this is one of the great creatures in the history of american rhetoric. aretha franklin, arguably the greatest sound to emerge out of a human vocal cord, reverberating, vibrating, maybe the greatest sound made, some would say others. sam cooke, maybe sam cooke and aretha franklin. but everything franklin, ingenious was nurtured by her father, reverend franklin. i used to listen to this man every night in michigan. if you don't die before you get a chance to hear this man preach, you don't have -- the son sermon in the african-american tradition, of the greatest preachers ever. he ordained jesse jackson. he marched with martin luther king jr. in detroit, where king delivered arguably, even more impressive version of his i have a dream speech in detroit. got to show love to the home town, the crib. skip gates's book was here next to nelson george, where did our love go? nelson george is perhaps the most gifted african-american man of the letters of our time. what can't this guy do? he is a novelist
? >> i cannot believe that we have the president of the united states of america in grand junction, colorado. [applause] we are so proud of you. >> thank you. >> i am a naturalized citizen, and i am proud to be an american. [applause] as a child, i had polio, and i have had 52 surgeries to correct my bones. between here and the mayo clinic in phoenix arizona, i have been blessed with a good insurance, generally excellent doctors and care. however, my major concern in costs, even with good insurance, and has been high, when i have been gone out of the network. why should our doctors' treatment choice be limited by a geographic area of the state? what kind of competition is this, mr. president? . decisions are being made by insurance companies. in fairness, we probably could not construct a system in which you could see any doctor anywhere in the world any time regardless of expense. bulb be hard to set up. if you live in maine, you are going to fly into california -- put you up -- you can see, and i'm not trying to make light of it, but you can see the difficulty. with any system we
on the cnn express across america talking to you about your health coverage and what you want to see in reform. ali, what are they telling you? >> reporter: and i'm here in kansas city, missouri, with the cnn express. i've been hearing a lot from people across the country. we've started in georgia, went through tennessee, kentucky, illinois, missouri, and now into kansas and then into iowa. we're finding out what people are feeling about health care. the debate, as we've seen, has been heated in town hall meetings all over the country. when we stopped in paducah, kentucky, i had a very civilized, very normal conversation with some folks about their fears and hopes for health care reform, christine. have a listen to this. >> reporter: we are hearing different things from people wherever we're going but i haven't found too many people around here who are opposed to reforming health care. >> i'm for the idea but i don't think that congress and the president have done a good job of disseminating information. i'm just hearing a lot of talk. >> reporter: what about you? >> i think right no
for health care in america. town halls are causing public uproar confusion. al li is curing the country on cnn express. joining us from the missouri state fair. talk about getting the pulse of america, what are you hearing? >> reporter: we have been driving from atlanta to des moines and passed through georgia, tennessee, kentucky, illinois, missouri, heading into kansas and iowa. we're talking to people in places smaller than what would get media coverage about health care. as the health care debate was heating up on tv, we were trying to get a quieter discussion going. there was plenty of disagreement where we went. we ended up in an interesting place, northwestern kentucky on the illinois border. we had a bit of a town hall meeting. one was a democratic candidate who ran in the last election and lost. she had very, very strong views on health care. here is a bit of a taste of what she told us. >> well, my husband and i are two of the 47 million plus that don't have health care. i'm not talking insurance. i want health care. my husband had diabetes and a bout with cancer. what insuran
just help saved taxpayers over a half billion bucks. the >> from america's news headquarters i'm jamie colby. developing right now jim webb's office confirms he's won the release of an american prisoner in myanmar. john yet few was sentenced to seven years for going to the home of an opposition leader. yettaw is to be officially deported sunday. also in california the wildfires continue to burn out of control. they are spreading. strong winds are fueling the flames and there is concern that could spark new fires. the governor will visit the fire zone this afternoon. president obama taking healthcare reform to colorado today. it will be his third town hall meeting and you can watch it live at 6:25 p.m. eastern on the fox news channel. join me at 1:00 p.m. eastern for "america's news headquarters." back to "cashin' in" right now. cheryl: which did you think the stimulus was meant for, stimulating jobs or stem lating union paychecks? new york's transit union says it is is the latter. it plans to take $360 million in taxpayer money meant for transportation projects and use it for a pay rai
to montana, that is one of the most nra saturated states in america. people take their personal liberties very seriously there. even for someone to stand up and say that i am an nra member, this would normally rattle the roof. i bought that was very revealing. let's assume that it was totally on the up and up and very legitimate. there are still some things that the president said today that are not getting near the target. for example, he continues to use the phrase 47 million. that figure is nonsense. there are a number of people who are uninsured because they don't fill out the forms yet they already qualify for medicaid and medicare. there are 12 million illegal aliens, is the president for to pay for every illegal person? there are a number of people who could afford insurance but they choose not to have it because they would rather have a new track or go to dinner more often. let's be honest about the figure. if we want to cover 5 million americans that cannot have insurance, i don't know anyone who has a problem with that. that is not that difficult. what the president's now wants
from the criticisms of america's right. >>> from australia, a story on another issue that has raised passions here -- the right to die. in perth, a quadriplegic man has asked a judge to let him kill himself. tonight, we have the ruling. >>> the president of taiwan raises the death toll from typhoon morakot to more than 500, amidst mounting criticism his government has been slow to help survivors. >>> and one night in bangkok is not just a hit song from the '80s. it could also describe how long it takes to go from one side of the city to the other. tonight, a report from bangkok's notorious traffic. buckle up. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here is what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible in part by the following funders -- >>> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> for weeks now, it's been topic number one in the united states. the president's ambitious plan to reform the health care system. there is probably no more controversial part of that plan than the so-called public optio. supporters say it will help drive down prices by
at rachel.msnbc.com. our podcast is at itunes or rachel.msnbc.com. can you hear my radio show on air america radio. "countdown with keith olbermann" starts right now. have a great weekend. good night. >>> which of these stories will you be talking about tomorrow? the president steps in front of the unscreened town hallers to whom he explains that they and the nation are being held hostage by insurance companies who are bankrupting families. >> i also get my news from the cable networks because i don't like the spin that comes from them other places. >> oh, you got to be careful about them cable networks, though. >> or with senators, democrat kent conrad of north dakota talks sabotage, says he can kill the essence of reform, the public option. speaking of killing, the cat fight between specter and grassley on twitter. specter tells grassley to stop scaring people with terms like "death panels." grassley says he never said death panels. true. grassley only said -- >> you have every right to fear. we should not have a government program that determines you're going to pull the plug on grandma.
that radio ad 40 years ago knew what lay ahead. good morning, america, from rock 'n' roll hallowed ground, bethel, new york, the site of woodstock and good morning to my groovy college back in manhattan, kate snow. >> peace to you, about i will. good morning. it is saturday, august 15th. we're also going to have the latest on president obama's trip out west to save his health care reform plan. many on both sides of the debate starting to wonder if his agenda is in some trouble. >>> we'll look at the return of superstar michael vick after 19 months in prison. a lot of questions about whether he should be allowed to make a comeback. >>> but bill is talking about a different kind of comeback. the celebration at woodstock. good morning again, bill. >> good moing, kate. it's going to be a fantastic morning. hard to imagine 40 years ago this moment this field was filled with almost 500,000 people and another million on the road trying to get in. you know, america's full of commemorative battlefields but this is one of those rare commemorative peace fields celebrating the love that broke out 40
he is on the right path. this is the most tragic moment we have had in the history of america, since the great depression and world war ii, and i want to be part of the team of leadership, accountable leadership leadership that says, these are the facts, and that is how you have to see it. but i want our children to be all they can be in their educational opportunity, because we need them to lead america again. health care reform is an absolute requirement. the dividend we get from it in the navy is what you see in how we accomplished our jobs. america has to have that. in our economy, it is what it is about. entrepreneurialship should be the norm, not the exception. to have all the answers? absolutely not. experience? yes, i dealt with sailors on a nuclear ship, but the average age was 19. i just want pennsylvania to have leadership in the future that is working for them, and i promised to do that every day. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. >> i would love to follow up, thank you. [applause] >> a thank you. thank you to both candidates, to everyone who put this together. >> penns
in america. so i would actually make this more small business-friendly than even the blue dogs did. if it was up to me, i'd say anybody with a payroll of less than million dollars or anybody with a number of employees less than 50 is exempt from the mandate. now we're going to take the flier. i see i only have a few minutes left. i'm just -- i have -- since i wrote about this in the book, i feel some -- i think it's okay for me to say this. i'm not pushing this. but it was part of my platform in 2004. [laughter] >> it's slightly revised. [applause] >> if i were going to do this, i actually argue in the book that we really don't need a mandate and i don't think mandates are going to be very popular. because mandating anything with the american people is never very popular which is why it makes me mad while the republicans think about sticking us with the mandates that we have today. [applause] >> but if i could do this any way i wanted to, this is a flier, i'm not lobbying for this. all i care about is the public option. i would give everybody under 25 or 30 medicaid for free. and i
in -- accountable. we must and against a subtle but growing tierney of our time. we must take america back. thank you very much. and [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please give a hand to a leader in the conservative movement. the author of "leave us alone", groverno grover norquist. >> after the 2008 election, our friends on the left have some advice for a spread they suggested we move to the left and stop talking about taxes and spending. it was very similar to the advice they give us after goldwater lost in 1964, after watergate in 1974 and in 1992. the other team always cheerfully advises not to be us. they said please stop talking about taxes. this reminds me of the scene late in the movie where the bad guy says to the heroine, put down the gun and we will talk. and the movie goes on for another 25 minutes. they give us this advice because they understand that would strengthen as the center-right movement is our opposition to big government, our support for liberty and desire to have lower taxes and regulation and more freedom. but our coalition holds together because everybody here and e
" starts right now. >>> well, august is make or break month for health care in america. town halls are causing public uproar, confusion running rampant. our key business correspondent ali velshi touring the country on what else? the cnn express. joining us now from the missouri state fair. talk about getting the pulse of america, ali, what are you hearing? >> reporter: yeah. this is a fantastic place to do that. we've been driving from atlanta to des moines and we passed through georgia, kentucky, tennessee. illinois, missouri heading into kansas and iowa and we're talking to people usually in places smaller than would normally get media coverage about health care. in the beginning of the week as the debate was really heating up on tv with the town hall meetings we were trying to get a quieter discussion going. there was plenty of disagreement where we went. we ended up in one interesting place in paducah, kentucky, northwestern kentucky just on the illinois border and had a bit of a town hall meeting. one of the women was formerly a congressional candidate. she was a democratic ca
now to explain what that means is alan hartigan of america's town hall and cheryl galloway, the interim director for americans for prosperity. how do you feel about the town hall today? do you think it was successful? >> absolutely. it was a great event. we put this together in four weeks to have a crowd of 5,000 people in four weeks, is just phenomenal. over 20 organizes were represented. you helped out with that, i spoke to you earlier, you were part of organizing events as well as tea parties. how do you feel about what happened here today? >> i love to see the energy here. it's hot, august day, everybody was burning up. but there was a lot of enthusiasm and energy. people are glad to be able to tell their view, their side of the story. what they want to see washington do. i love seeing that people were ve responsive. i gave a speech to positive alternatives and people were enthusiastic about that as well. >> even on such a hot day, it was interesting to see how many people came out here. but from thevent these guys organizes here today, across the country, we've been he
, the minneapolis newspaper praises michelle bachman's son for going in to teach for america. says he's a smart, caring kid who must have been well raised. so she declares the paper has done a hit job on him. and karl rove on family? and joe the plumber, the standup comedian? how will we know when his act is over? all that and more now on "countdown." good evening from new york. after weeks of fear mongering, shouting lies, death threats, and more in our fifth story today the president came face to face with a real american who challenged him on health care reform. the stage had been set for a couple days with a group affiliated with the tea party offshoot americans for prosperity whipping up opposition to greet mr. obama when he arrived for today's town hall in belgrade, montana. it will be important to see montanans come out in force to say no to government health care. a member of patients first told the associated press yesterday. some 1300 people got inside after first come first serve ticket giveouts at two city halls. one of those people a welder named randy had driven almost all the way
the kids who heard that radio ad 40 years ago knew what lay ahead. good morning, america, from rock 'n' roll hallowed ground, bethel, new york, the site of woodstock and good morning to my groovy college back in times square, kate snow. >> good morning, peace to you, bill. it is saturday, august 15th. we're also going to have the latest on president obama's trip out west to try to save his health care reform plan. many on both sides of the debate starting to wonder if his agenda is in trouble there. >>> we'll look at the return of football superstar michael vick after 19 months in prison for animal abuse. a lot of questions today about whether he should be allowed to make a comeback. >>> but bill is talking about a very different kind of comeback. the celebration at woodstock. hi, bill >> that's right, the generation that dropped acid now drops antacid but still have the rock 'n' roll peace and love spirit. hard to imagine there were nearly 500,000 of them 40 years ago on this dairy farm in the catskills. so many commemorative battlefields. this is one of those rare monuments devoted t
that the american people get a fair deal when it comes to health care in america, please give max baucus a big round of applause. >> reporter: in private, top presidential advisors admit the fight has reached a critical age. the opposition has gained steam, capitalizing on anger over debt the and bailout at town hall meetings. >> where does that state that government has these powers to take over health care? >> reporter: by comparison, the president's town hall here was pretty tame. though he did get one pointed question that reflected the strong opposition he's facing. >> we keep getting the bull. that's all we get is bull. you can't tell us how you're going to pay for this. the only way you're going to get that money is to raise our taxes. you said you wouldn't. >> look, you are absolutely right that i can't cover another 46 million people for free. >> reporter: but the president did not shrink from the challenge and vowed again he will not raise taxes on the middle class to pay for the difference. >> when i was campaigning, i made a promise that i would not raise your taxes if you made $250,000
as the largest townhall so far on health care. this one is called "america's health care townhall." and you can see the folks there. let's walk around and show you some of the folks. 1,000 people here. people streaming in and out. the crowd was a little larger earlier. up on the stage. dick armey, former house of representatives majority leader and a conservative radio talk show host. doctors, other people up on the stage there talking about -- their concerns about the plan. not many specifics about what they're concerned about. mostly talking what they disagree with. who they don't want involved in the plan. mostly they don't want involved in the plan, the president, speaker of the house and also the majority leader. but there are folks we have been seeing signs of, about, no obama care. no socialized medicine. socialized medicine is killing people. read the bill. and there are some crazy signs. but that is very, have to say, only a very small percentage of the people who have signs that may be sort of deemed as something you wouldn't want shown on television or you wouldn't want said about an
strong majority in america that says no. sean: we have spent a lot of time talking about what is now commonly known as the death panels, these end-of-life counselors, the house will would mandate that when they're older in life, this would be mandatory and maybe more often. the senate just confirmed that they are dropping it from the bill. they had been denying it existed and now they're saying we're going to drop it. is that a victory for the people showing up at town halls? >> yes. they were trying to say these are nuts and sarah palin isn't very smart. sean: put a victory in sarp's column. >> i -- sarah palin's column. >> i found an op ed, which was a soup esh and said this is a real problem give financial incentives to doctors where we relied upon them working out with layer lawyer and now we are going to have a doctor going to make complicated decisions. and going to give them money to do it and then have them provide key questions and available resources. and the government defines both. is the government going to say, the catholic church is an available resource when it comes
. there you go. >> i cannot believe that we have a president of the united states of america and grand junction, colorado. [ applause ] >> we're so proud of you. >> thank you. >> my name is maria wells, and i live on the slope in gross, colorado and i'm a naturalized citizen and i'm proud to be an american. [ applause ] >> as a child i had polio and i have had serious surgeries, 52 of them to correct my poor construction bonds. between hear, deborah, montrose and the mayo clinic in phoenix, arizona. i have been blessed with good insurance, generally excellent doctors and care, however, my major concern is cost even with good -- even with good insurance , our cost is then high , practically and i have been gone out of the network, why should our doctors treatment choice be limited by a geographic area or the state? what kind of competition is this, mr. president? thank you. >> all right. this raises an important question, because it goes to the overall debate that's taking place out there right now. when we talk about reform, you hear some opponents of reform sang that somehow we are tr
at the belief in middle america that they are experiencing the blunt of this recession. the politicians had that huge stimulous pigout. that is one thing. secondly, healthcare, they believe this reform is going to take away benefits they have. i tell you, as exhilarated by these democrats, calling them un-american, harry reid calling them evil mongers, other people calling them mobs and thugs. the backlash against the democratic party here is astonishing. middle american by 2 to 1, they agree with the protesters and not with the democratic party. >> eleanor. >> first of all, cindy said to shout down over people views is un-american. they didn't call the shouters un-american. i think the president has lost momentum here. people who have insurance are worried that they are going to lose something in this very extensive package. and the president really doesn't have a single bill that he can point to. he doesn't have a clear message and all of the bills floating around on political provide lots of inviting targets for people who want to kill healthcare and want to kill the obama presidency a
this done. this is obviously a tough time in america, a tough time here in montana. just six months ago we were in the middle of the worst recession in our lifetimes. we were losing about 700 jobs each month. economists of all stripes feared a second coming of the great depression. that is why we acted as best as we could to pass a recovery plan to stop the freefall. i want to just beat briefly about the recovery plan because that has our people's view of the health care debate. the recovery plan was divided into three parts. one-third of the money in the revery act went to tax cuts that have already started showing up in the paychecks of about 400,000 working families in montana. 400,000 working families have seen their taxes reduced because of the recovery act. [applause] we also cut taxes for small businesses on the investments that they make in more than 200 montanans small businesses have qualified for new loans backed by the recovery act, including ten businesses right in the boseman area. [applause] another one-third of the money in the recovery act is for emergency relief for folks
halls all across america. on tuesday i was in new hampshire talking about people denied coverage because of preexisting conditions. yesterday i was in montana talking about people who had their insurance policies suddenly revoked even though they were paying their premiums, just because they got sick. today we're talking about people like nathan and his family who have insurance, but are still stuck with huge bills because they hit a cap on their benefits or are charged exorbitant out of pocket fees. when you hear about these experiences, when you think about the millions of people denied coverage because of preexisting conditions and the thousands who have had their policies canceled because of an illness, countless people like nathan, i want you to remember one thing, there but for the grace of god go i. [ applause ] this is something that sometimes we have forgotten during the course of this health care debate. these are ordinary americans. they're no different than anybody else. they're working hard, they're meeting their responsibilities. they're held hostage by health insurance com
. there are so many different philosophies and idea in america. i don't think any, any plan that comes out, will be acceptable to one part of the population or another to a very significant degree. and it's jealousy when somebody has something that you can't have, it bothers you. so i would look to suggest that there be one benefit plan for every american in this system. and then people who want to -- >> what's your question? >> then people who want to have other benefits besides that they can do something like the medicare supplemental insurance plans. so i would look to ask your opinion on that? >> both, both senator, well i shouldn't say, i shouldn't never speak for senator bachus. i feel in this area that maybe i can say that he and i are working toward something that is going to give americans more choice than what you are suggestion would be. now, will we be able to, working and talking, and i don't know there will be a product or not. but we are working towards a direction of having people to have choice. >>> the townhall held by senator chuck grassley. none of this is stopping. the
of the real discussion that america deserves. >> our senior white house correspondent, ed henry, is traveling with the president. first montana, later today, colorado. why these locations specifically? >> reporter: partially because these are not necessarily democratic areas friendly. president made a point to come to montana, colorado, in the mountain west. the democratic presidential candidates had abandoned thinking they couldn't win in previous elections. he won some of them. he is trying to translate the health reform debate. when you talk to a white house debate, you say, look, he can have a reasoned debate with people that don't agree with him. he is showing a counterweight with the other town hall meetings. trying to turn the temperature down on things, saying, look, we can have a reason to face a civil debate. he had one here in montana yesterday at the town hall. only one sharp exchange, one or two. one that got a lot of attention, a man pretty blunt, plain spoken, saying all i'm getting from you and democrats is bull. the president repeated his campaign pledge and said, we will hav
worthiy of the real discussion that america deserves one where we lower our voices listen to one another and talk with differences that really exist. >> now, a gop leader says there should be a bipartisan solution to reform and the republican radio and internet address, senator orrin hatch agreed that every citizen should have affordable and quality health care and adds americans should disagree respectfully. >> nearly 85% of americans have coverage. and they are really worried about what reform means for them, especially our seniors. and these concerns are moving from kitchen table conversations to town hall discussions. i am disappointed about the attempts to characterize the behavior of americans expressing their concerns as "un-american." although i vongly encourage the use of respectful debate in these town halls we should not be stifling these discussions. there is nothing un-american about disagreements. in fact, our great nation was founded on speak our minds. families are voicing their concerns because they feel like they are not being heard in washington and i'm here to tell yo
insurance company in america? nice tidbit there. boss: exactly. and i've been thinking, looking a bit more businesslike might help too. gecko: oh my. uhhh, no it's, what's, what's the word... vogeico. 15 minutes could save you 15 percent or more on car insurance. >>> it is a make or break month on health care reform. as our lawmakers are back at home during their august recess meeting with their constituents, trying to discuss health care reform. cnn's ali velshi has been traveling the country as well during this august recess, traveling on the cnn express gauging the pulse of america. gauging what people are feeling about health care reform and ali, we've both seen a lot of town hall sessions and forums that have become quite tense. i understand, a lot of people you've talked to, are you haven't had that same kind of tension. >> no, not at all, in fact. we have had disagreement, there's no question. we've traveled 1,000 miles in six days and people think health care reform is very urgent, needs to happen now. and those who think it's moving too quickly and we've had them in the same plac
get a fair deal when it comes to health care in america. give him a big round of applause. >> reporter: in private, top presidential advisors said the fight reached a critical stage. the opposition gained steam, capitalizing on anger over bail outs and debt. >> where does it state government has these powers to take over health care. >> by comparison, the president's town hall was tame. he got one pointed question that reflected the strong opposition he's facing. >> we keep getting the bull. that's all we get, bull. you can't tell us how you are going to pay for this. the only way to get that money is to raise our taxes. you said you wouldn't. >> look, you are absolutely right that i can't cover another 46 million people for free. >> but the president did not shrink from the challenge. he vowed not to change taxes for the middle class. >> i promised i would not raise your taxes if you made $250,000 or less. for people, like myself, who make more than that, there's nothing wrong with helping people who have a little less. >> it's easier said than done. it leaves the details of how to pa
of the united states of america in grand junction, colorado. we are so proud of you. >> thanks. >> my name is maria elena wells and i live in mt. rose, colorado and i am a naturalized citizen and i am proud to be an american. >> thank you. >> i, as a child i had polio and i have had a series of surgeries, 52 of them to correct my poor structure of bones, between here, mt. rose and the mayo clinic in phoenix, arizona. i have been blessed with good insurance, generally excellent doctors and care. however my major concern and costs, even with good and -- even with the good insurance, our costs have been high practically when i have been gone out of the network. why should our doctors' treatment choice be limited by a geographic area or the state? what kind of competition is this, mr. president? >> okay, all right. >> thank you. >> this raises an important question because it goes to the overall debate that's taking place out there right now. when we talk about reform, you hear some opponents of reform saying that somehow we are trying to ration care or restrict the doctors that you can see, o
america has ever produced. when he died in the spring of 1870, 10000 people attended his funeral, and flags across the nation were hung at half mast. the president of the united states, ulysses s. grant, general william tecumseh sherman, joseph hooker, philip sheridan, george gordon meade, and other notables overrate were among the vast concourse of mourners who gathered to pay their respects. his passing was considered a national calamity. today, textbooks often omit him or giving up just a few lines. yet no man was more responsible for thomas for the union victory in the war. how may we summarize his life? born into a slaveholding family in virginia, not far from the site of the climactic battle of the revolutionary war at yorktown, he chafed early on that the system of slavery that sustain his family's wealth. as a boy, he told the families slays how to read and write it is said against his parents wishes, and if not quite an abolitionist as a young man, he was one in the making, as revealed by his conduct in subsequent years. at the age of 19, he went off to west point, did w
. these are legitimate differences worthy of the real discussion that america deserves, one where we lower our voices, listen to one another and talk about differences that really exist. >>> in a new radio interview, john murtha is casting down on the president ace timeline saying it is not clear there will be a bill before january. i am joined live from d.c. by john decker, washington correspondent for reuters. good morning to you. >> good morning to you. >> listen to what representative murtha also says, lawmakers are telling nancy pelosi not to rush this legislation. are these new comments a bad sign for oat ba the obama administration. >> it is not a good sign. john murtha is a close ally of the house speaker. he has represented western pennsylvania since 1974. he is one of the longest serving members of the house of representatives. it is not a good sign. you hear the same message from the newest members of the house, the house democrats who are freshmen saying they are concerned's well. they are concerned because they are hearing a lot from their constituents now that they are back on their aug
apparently are winning america, because the polls show that 35% i think of those polled said they agree with the protesters, and 16% said, no, the protester are dead wrong. so the folks in these town hall meetings are winning. >> we brought up that loop, that's what everyone is looking at, just one after another edit of the antagonistic side, but go ahead, chris. >> you know, i don't agree with what pat just said. i mean, here's i think the reality of where we are right now. there's about a third of the country that doesn't support health care reform, they're called republicans. there's a third of the country that supports health care reform, called democrats. there's a third of the country, which is independents, moderates that aren't clear, they want reform, but they want specifics and clarity. this is the advantage the democrats have and this is why you'll see significant health care reform passed. >> but, chris, hold it. the trouble is, when you get into the independents and the moderates, the president is under water now with that group on health care, whereas before all of those f
. >> these are legitimate differences worthy of the real discussion that america deserves one where we lower our voices listen to one another and talk about differences that really exist. >> the president is holding another in a series of townhall meetings that look a lot like his election campaign. reform opponents are running a pretty good campaign of their own. >> thank y'all very much, welcome to the rumble. >> democrats have been on the defensive all week. >> it's my opinion what we are seeing right now is the intentional systematic dismantling of the american republic. >> i would not tell my 11-year-old daughter, she ran five cars in the ditch here is a nother car. no you fix up the problem why you can't get another car. >> republicans say the is righteous indig nation. >> there is nothing unamerican about disagreements. in fact our great nation was founded on speaking our minds. >> meanwhile the president will continue his campaign. trying to convince america that health care reform isn't about politics. in short the president is trying to turn this debate from a national screaming match into a
and how reforms could affect you, check out the special health care in america website on cnn.com. you can get the very latest by going to cnn.com/health care. >>> the first steps in drew peterson's murder trial are getting underway. the judge said he's presuming the trial won't be moved, so he had hundreds of potential jurors fill out questionnaires. peterson says he'll do whatever it takes. >> if we can't pick a fair jury, then the government's job is to find a place where we can find an impartial jury. >> so far, no trial date has been set yet. peterson, you may recall, is the former police officer who was charged with murder in the death of his third and i wife and is a suspect in the disappearance of his fourth wife. >>> search crews will try again today to find a missing georgia woman. the woman vanished tuesday night while taking a walk along a north georgia road. searchers found her cell phone last night about three miles away. her boyfriend said he was on the phone with her and she mentioned a car pull up and then he heard screams. there are indications of a struggle. >>> tonight
to the top story, town hall meetings demonstrates that many in america have serious questions about the proposals under consideration. one major point of contention and sticking point for my next guest is the so-called end of life language. congress us from michigan, congressman pat mccotter. good to see you. some people are worried about what they perceived to be the so-called end of language-- end of life language that's in this house bill. where is that exactly? is it real? is it something to be concerned about? >> end of life provisions, brian, are not per se something that people tend to object to. if they're in the proper context, in the compassionate bill that empowers patients, that leads to the increase in supply of health care, and these are places that these provisions would be acceptable to many of them. when you put it in the context of a government rationing bill that's a place we do not think is to put an end of life provision. down the road you could see where the misuses that have could occur. supporters of the provisions of the current bill, compassionate choices,
people get a fair deal when it comes to health care in america, please give max bachus a round of applause. >> reporter: in private, top presidential advisers acknowledged the fight reached a critical stage because the opposition reached some steam, capitalizing on anger at congressional town hall meetings. >> where does this state that government has the powers to take over health care. >> reporter: by comparison the president's town hall was tame. he did get one pointed question that reflected the strong opposition he's facing. >> we keep getting the bull. that is all we get the bull. you can't tell us how you are going to pay for this. the only way you are going to get that money is to raise our taxes. you said you wouldn't. >> look, you are absolutely right that i can't cover another 46 million people for free. >> reporter: but the president did not shrink from the challenge and vowed again he will not raise taxes on the middle class to pay for health care. >> when i was campaigning imad a promise i would not raise your taxes if you made $250 thoob or less. for people like
a tough time for the families in colorado and all across america. i just want to rewind the clock a little bit, because sometimes people have forgotten what's transpired over the last seven, eight months. just six months ago, we were in the middle of the worst recession of our lifetimes. we were losing about 700,000 jobs each month. economists from the left and the right, liberals and conservatives, feared the second coming of the great depression. i don't know if everybody remembers that, that was six months ago. that's why we acted as fast as we could to pass a recovery plan to stop the free fall. and there's been a lot of misinformation about that so let me just talk briefly about what it is that we did. the recovery plan was divided into three parts. one-third of the money, one-third of the money in the recovery act, the stimulus plan, went to tax cuts that are already showing up in the paychecks of nearly 2 million working families in colorado, including right here in grand junction. [ applause ] so i just want everybody to be clear, one-third of it, tax cuts, not tax increases. more
of north america, had trees doing their job of regulating the climate. gradually, we are taking it all away for farmland or city, and we don't notice what we are doing. the present ipcc models, predict almost unanimously that by 2014, the average summer in the north-central regions of the world will be as hot as the summer in 2003 in europe, where over 30,000 people died from heat. by then we may cool ourselves with air-conditioning and learn to live in a climate not much worse than baghdad now, but without extensive irrigation, the plants will die, and a natural ecosystems will be replaced by scrub and desert. what will there be to eat? that is the problem. the same dire changes will affect the rest of the world and i can envision you in america by grating, perhaps people in other parts of america will migrate here to seattle because it will stay relatively cool, but they will also go to canada. the chinese have the option of going to siberia if they are allowed to go there. but will there be enough food for us all? we may have about 20 years to prepare for these events. we can't go on bur
america's new rootless professional class," i objected to the publisher's decision to call this new. i it goes back to the origins of world trade, as far back as the east india company and hudson bay company, nothing particularly new to being a diplomat or preacher or businessman or woman. for decades, ibm employees have said the initials stand for i have been moved. what is new? the growth of the numbers of corporate freeloaders. the breadwinners, i will start -- what is new is the growth in the numbers of corporate relos, a number i estimate to be ten million people. the breadwinners and their families and how that has grown with the growth of the american economy. american foreign trade, to cite a statistic, all the goods and services that we buy and sell abroad, from $400 billion in 1970 to over $3 trillion now. as companies, american and foreign, they need people to carry their banner and build business far from home. you have not heard the word relosville because i made it up. they are cereal long-distance movers. the word relos probably a originated among suburban real estate ag
in america, please give max baucus a big round of applause. >> reporter: in private, top presidential advisers acknowledge the fight has reached a critical stage because the opposition has gained some steam. capitalizing on anger over federal bailouts and debt at many congressional town hall meetings. >> -- the government has these powers to take over health care? >> reporter: by comparison the president's town hall here was pretty tame, though he did get one pointed question that reflected the strong opposition he's facing. >> we keep getting the bull, that's all we get is bull. you can't tell us how you're going to pay for it. the only way you're going to get that money is to raise our taxes. you said you wouldn't. >> look, you are absolutely right that i can't cover another 46 million people for free. >> reporter: but the president did not shrink from the challenge. and vowed again he will not raise taxes on the middle class to pay for the difference. >> when i was campaigning, i made a promise that i would not raise your taxes if you made $250,000 a year or less. that's what i sai
for america russian ark is the successor to obama for america or. that's what the dnc set up to help the candidate treated so that would be illegal. that's where reverend in-sourcing can you rephrase the question without suggesting that we are violating the law somehow ? >> mike: he wanted e-mails we contacted the people and send them back to the white house they will look at them safe and get them off the list. >> clayton: the white house as they maintain a massive e-mail list to promote positions on things such as healthcare. we'll get our updates. >> mike: i would like to get off a lot of lists. get rid of all the spam in my computer so i can only imagine the ones you are on. meantime we have to update you on the tom hall's because president obama is gearing up for another time on meeting and sightseeing today after yesterday's meeting in montana. joining us from big sky montana is mike emanuel. good morning early to you. how did this town hall meeting go yesterday? spent it was pretty good, alysin president obama today will be parked tourist in chief taking his family to yellowst
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